International Women’s Day with Microsoft Accelerators

With accelerators around the world, we are lucky to work with a wide range of startup founders who come from different countries, different backgrounds, and different points of view.

For International Women’s Day, we wanted to take the chance to highlight some of our female founders and speak with them about being a woman in the tech and entrepreneurial space. We spoke to women from across the world and across different industries to discuss the past, present, and future of women in tech. Read their thoughts below, and watch the video for more!

Tal Shoham, CEO of Evolero

Tal Shoham, CEO of Evolero

What's the single piece of advice you would want to give any young woman seeking out a career in tech or STEM?

Tal Shoham: I think a good piece of advice would be to screen stuff out. You talk to a lot of smart people who really want to give advice and help you out. I take into consideration everything that’s coming in, and then I screen and make the decision myself.

Larissa Lielacher: I would suggest that young women learn how to code, you don’t have to be perfect at it but having the basics really opens up millions of possibilities to work with cool people on cool products.

Tammy Bowers: I would say just don’t give up and believe in yourself. I started out as a stay-at-home mom of 4 two years ago and here I am, running my own company, being involved in Microsoft, pitching executives… you can do it!

Anna Kaiser, CEO of Tandemploy

Anna Kaiser, CEO of Tandemploy

We are seeing more women stepping into the CEO role today, particularly in the technology space. Do you think this is a trend that we’ll see continue? Do you think things are getting easier for women in tech?

Anna Kaiser: I hope that it’s going to continue, that there’s going to be no difference between male and female founders, and anyone who wants to found a company.

Maya Gura: I think we’ll be seeing a lot of women as CEOs and entrepreneurs and many more successful positions.

Hila Goldman-Aslan: Companies that have more women in management positions are more successful, so it’s actually proven itself to be something that every company should do.

Larissa Lielacher, CEO of Flockpit

Larissa Lielacher, CEO of Flockpit

How important do you think the role of education is in getting more girls and women into STEM?

Larissa Lielacher: I actually think the role of education is the major factor, I actually see that now, I have a sister who is 14 years old and I took the initiative to try to teach her how to code. I think that if that is taught to boys and girls equally at a young age them women will continue to continue to create more amazing products and software.

Tal Shoham: Education is key here, the younger the better. It’s about just getting these girls role models that are going to work for them, even if it’s just giving them more ideas.

Maya Gura, CEO of Missbeez

Maya Gura, CEO of Missbeez

Maya Gura: I think we have to put a lot of resources and information to educating girls between the ages of 5 and 13 that whatever they desire, whatever they want or they believe in, it’s definitely achievable and they don’t have to compromise.

Jana Tepe, CEO of Tandemploy

Jana Tepe, CEO of Tandemploy

How did you first get interested in tech? Who are your role models and who inspired you?

Jana Tepe: We are inspired every day by each other! It sounds a bit cheesy, but as we job-share the CEO role, I’m inspired every day by Anna [Kaiser]’s knowledge and ideas.

Hila Goldman-Aslan: One of the founders of DiaCardio is the head of the Echocardiography unit in Seroka, which is one of the biggest hospitals in Israel. She’s a woman, she has 3 kids, she is a key opinion leader in her field, and she is a role model for me. Really, whenever I see a woman in a management position or higher up in a company is an inspiration for me.

Hila Goldman-Aslan, CEO of DiaCardio

Hila Goldman-Aslan, CEO of DiaCardio

What is a moment that you are most proud of in your career?

Hila Goldman-Aslan: A few months ago we won first place in the Global Innovation Competition in China. More than 1,000 companies applied and 21 companies came to China where we were evaluated by 13 judges. I presented our company in a five-minute presentation. We won first place and being on stage in front of 2,000 people and winning was a big moment for me.

Tal Shoham: A big moment that I’m very proud of is that as an event technology entrepreneur, I get to see the presence of women at events as part of my daily routine.